2017 Utah State Historical Society Conference (Applications Due April 15)

By March 9, 2017

Local Matters

The Utah State Historical Society invites the public, scholars, students, policymakers, and organizations to submit proposals for papers, panels, or multimedia presentations on the theme Local Matters. This is both a call for papers and a call for the participation of community organizations such as museums, preservation groups, and historical societies. Sessions for the 65th annual Utah State History Conference will be held on October 11, 2017, at the Utah Cultural Celebration Center.

Local can be broadly conceived. We encourage submissions examining the many strands that create the fabric of communities—such as interpersonal networks, long-standing festivals, neighborhood structures, churches, schools, or the arts—or that focus more narrowly on a family or a home. And community may also be interpreted broadly as communities of faith, advocacy, hobbies, politics, and so forth. Submissions might also consider the historical roots of the recent vogue for things local: farm-to-table eating, urban redevelopment, public markets, or local music.

Separately, we welcome papers and panels that discuss the uses and historiography of local history and the application of sophisticated methodology to personal, family, and community history. How do communities go about compiling their histories? What role do organizations play in preserving local history? How does community history intersect with broader historical themes?

Submissions on other aspects of Utah history will also be considered. We welcome a range of formats, from the traditional panels and sessions to more innovative formats. We encourage full session or panel submissions, though we will make every effort to match single paper proposals with other panels and papers.

Each proposal must include:

  • Each paper proposal, whether individual or in a session, should include a 1,000-word abstract detailing the presentation and its significance. Submissions for entire sessions or panels should include a session title and a 1000 word session abstract that outlines the purpose of the session, along with a confirmed chair and/or commentator, if applicable.
  • Brief bio (50-word limit) and accompanying c.v. with address, phone, and email for each participant
  • Audio-visual requirements
  • Your permission, if selected, for media interviews, session audio/visual recordings, and electronic sessions or podcasts during or in advance of the conference. The Historical Society will use these recording in its effort to meet its history-related mission.

We will accept submissions until April 15, 2017.

Click here to submit a individual paper proposal

Click here to submit a panel or multiple presenter session proposal

Please direct questions regarding submissions to Dr. George or Dr. Rogers at uhq@utah.gov.

For general conference information, please contact Alycia Rowley at 801-245-7226 or aaldrich@utah.gov.

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