Mormon Studies Weekly Roundup

By February 23, 2014

For your enjoyment, this week’s edition of the MSWR.

A short discussion of the religious roots of rock ‘n’ roll by way of the secular yet Mormon band Imagine Dragons on NPR.

The call for papers for the third Mormon Media studies conference, hosted by BYU and BYU-I’s communication departments. The theme is “Mormons and Meaning: How media shapes Mormon identities,” and it will take place on Friday, October 17, 2014, in Salt Lake City. See details here.

By Common Consent is doing a series of commentaries on documents in the Joseph Smith Papers that are worth your time: part one, part two, part three.

Lastly: the deadline to apply to the first annual Wheatley “Faith Seeking Understanding” summer seminar has been pushed back to March 28, 2014. The seminar runs from July 14-August 1, 2014, and is sponsored by the Wheatley Institution at Brigham Young University, under the supervision of Professor Terryl Givens. Times and Seasons has the details here: check it out to see if it’s something you might be interested in!

Article filed under Miscellaneous


  1. Thanks, Saskia!

    Comment by David G. — February 23, 2014 @ 9:49 pm


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