New Guest Blogger: Ardis S.

By March 4, 2009

Since Ryan T. did so well, we decided to try another advanced-beyond-their-age undergraduate. JI is pleased to announce our newest guestblogger, Ardis S; this is how Ardis introduces herself:

Hi Juvenile Instructor! My name is Ardis Smith, and I am an undergraduate student in History graduating this April. Social history is my favorite category of history. I recently completed and successfully defended an Honors thesis on eighteenth-century English kinship, something that I studied at both BYU and Cambridge. I also have researched for the past year the civil rights movement as portrayed in the BYU student newspaper The Daily Universe during the 1950s and 1960s. When I am not studying history, I enjoy music, photography, Model United Nations, and playing games with family and friends.

On a personal note, Ardis and I were fellow students at BYU’s (now ceased) Semester at Nauvoo Program, and I can attest to both her intellectual brilliance and¬†pleasant nature.

Please join us in welcoming Ardis.

Article filed under Announcements and Events


Comments

  1. This is such a weird experience, for both Ardis and me. Uh, welcome Ardis! /s/ Ardis

    Comment by Ardis Parshall — March 4, 2009 @ 7:22 pm

  2. Wow, I thought there was only one Ardis left. This is like discovering there’s another Gelfling still alive.

    Comment by Steve Evans — March 4, 2009 @ 7:30 pm

  3. well, she sure has some name to live up to…

    Comment by Bored in Vernal — March 4, 2009 @ 7:30 pm

  4. There’s another Ardis? At least I’m the only Ben…

    Comment by Ben Pratt — March 4, 2009 @ 9:18 pm

  5. Well, Steve, Ardis’s middle name is Jen, and mine is Kira …

    Comment by Ardis Parshall — March 4, 2009 @ 9:31 pm

  6. Finally, another female! Thanks, Ben for getting Ardis on board. Ardis, welcome!

    Comment by Elizabeth — March 4, 2009 @ 9:37 pm

  7. Ben P (#4): You’re right; at least we don’t have that problem…

    Although by reading the comments, any astute person can tell the author of the smart “ben” comments (you) from the wanna be pundit (me).

    Comment by Ben — March 4, 2009 @ 10:12 pm

  8. Welcome Ardis. More 20th century topics are always welcome.

    Comment by David G. — March 4, 2009 @ 10:17 pm

  9. Is there like some sort of rule of the cosmos that women given the name “Ardis” are required to become kickass historians?

    Welcome, Ardis S.!

    Comment by Kevin Barney — March 4, 2009 @ 10:21 pm

  10. Welcome, Ardis S. I’m especially interested in your research on the Civil Rights movement’s portrayal in the DU, and hope you’ll be sharing some of that with us.

    Also, just out of curiosity, where does the name Ardis come from? Two years ago, I knew no one with that name, and now I know (of) two.

    Comment by Christopher — March 5, 2009 @ 10:20 am

  11. Chris, some of the baby books give fanciful, fairyish interpretations, with origins as varied as Hebrew and Swedish. The oldest, most likely explanation of its origin that I’ve ever found, and the one I like best, is that it comes from the Latin root for “fire”, like “ardent” and “arson.”

    So beware. We burn. :)

    Comment by Ardis Parshall — March 5, 2009 @ 10:30 am

  12. I really thought Ardis P. was adding a third blog to her routine. I feel much better now (and less like a slacker).

    Comment by esodhiambo — March 5, 2009 @ 2:03 pm

  13. Welcome, Ardis…its’ been awhile – since our terrible HIST 490 class together.

    Comment by Ryan Tobler — March 5, 2009 @ 6:56 pm

  14. Aw, Ben (#7), you’re making me blush!

    I look forward to hearing from you, Ardis S!

    Comment by Ben Pratt — March 5, 2009 @ 7:03 pm

  15. Thank you all for the warm welcome! I can tell I am in good company with the historians on this site…and especially with Ardis P.! I have only really known one other Ardis in the world, and I was named after her, so I am excited to have another great woman to share my name with!

    I have heard many different translations and supposed origins of the name Ardis. My personal favorite is “warrior maiden of God”, although flowering field is also one that I have frequently heard. It seems as though the true origin and meaning of the name may never be apparent, but it’s fun to speculate. It’s like guessing how many licks to the center of a Tootsie pop…the world may never know.

    Comment by Ardis S — March 5, 2009 @ 9:32 pm


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