JI goes Digital Humanities; or, introducing new guest blogger Tod Robbins

By July 2, 2012

We’re thrilled to introduce our latest guest blogger: long-time reader, digital humanist, and (as of last month) Master of Library and Information Science, Tod Robbins. Here’s how Tod introduces himself:

I received my masters of library and information science degree in June 2012. I am an activist for free speech, open access, and open standards in libraries, archives, and museums. My interests include open data, the future of genealogy, digital libraries, digital archives, maker/DIY culture, and community informatics.

The future of libraries is of central concern to me. I possess skills and attributes that make me appropriately situated to lead change in the cultural instutional space. My many experiences among a plethora, yes plethora, of fields of study have prepared me to excel and serve wherever I find myself.

I have worked in film, history, a grocery store, animation, data mining, digital archives, scheme change research, and a host of other areas. These experiences provide me with a broad view and appreciation for the challenges of the 21st century. I am equipped to meet these challenges with bright ideas, fresh resolve, and innovative tools. I love Mormon history and I am a wizard.

Tod certainly brings a new perspective to JI, and will be previewing some of his work that brings together JI’s focus—Mormon history—with his own—digital humanities and online databases—during his guest stint. And if we’re lucky, maybe he’ll even show off some of his wizarding skills.

Article filed under Announcements and Events Digital Humanities Methodology, Academic Issues Miscellaneous


Comments

  1. Welcome, Tod! I’m excited for your posts.

    Comment by Christopher — July 2, 2012 @ 8:03 am

  2. Welcome, Tod! I’m really looking forward to being part of the conversation around digital humanities and Mormon studies. Great to have you on board!

    Comment by Tona H — July 2, 2012 @ 8:16 am

  3. Excellent. Looking forward to these.

    Comment by Ben P — July 2, 2012 @ 8:32 am

  4. Welcome Tod.

    Comment by David G. — July 2, 2012 @ 8:55 am

  5. I like both plethoras and hosts, so I am stoked.

    Comment by J. Stapley — July 2, 2012 @ 9:46 am

  6. Cool. Welcome.

    Comment by Edje Jeter — July 2, 2012 @ 10:59 am

  7. Hey Tod, Great to see you here and I look forward to your blogging.

    Comment by David Knowlton — July 2, 2012 @ 11:23 am

  8. Welcome, Tod. Looking forward to what you have to share.

    Comment by Jared T. — July 2, 2012 @ 12:08 pm

  9. Welcome, Tod.

    Comment by Ryan T. — July 2, 2012 @ 2:01 pm

  10. TOD. ROBBINS.

    Comment by Jeremy Orbe-Smith — July 3, 2012 @ 6:48 am

  11. Wonderful! Looking forward to your posts!

    Comment by Amy T — July 3, 2012 @ 10:08 am

  12. […] (and there’s more on the way!) and adding to our ever-expanding roster of regulars, too. Tod Robbins, who has guest blogged for the last month here, has agreed to join the JI full-time (he also landed […]

    Pingback by Juvenile Instructor » Welcoming Tod Robbins as our newest permablogger — August 3, 2012 @ 1:48 pm


Series

Recent Comments

J Stuart on Review: Joseph Smith Papers: “Thanks, the chair.”


thechair on Review: Joseph Smith Papers: “Hi, it may be better to substitute “enormousness” or “immensity” for the two instances of “enormity” in this post. See https://www.ahdictionary.com/word/search.html?q=Enormity&submit.x=0&submit.y=0”


Mark Stoll on Guest Post: An Introduction: “Great to see this! I hope you've had a chance to look at the section on Mormons and environmentalism in Inherit the Holy Mountain: Religion and…”


Mark Ashurst-McGee on What's in a name?: “Why not go for a one-word book title? https://www.merriam-webster.com/words-at-play/authors-on-their-one-word-book-titles”


Sam Brown on Laurel Thatcher Ulrich's mentorship: “Such a lovely festschrift for such a great woman. Thanks for opening reflections on her legacy.”


Hannah Jung on What's in a name?: “I love it when the "pithy" parts of titles have a double meaning. "A House Full of Females" refers both to polygamy and to women's…”

Topics


juvenileinstructor.org