Mormon Studies in the Classroom: Roundup

By May 9, 2014

I’d like to thank all the contributors and those who provided excellent discussion during the Mormon Studies in the Classroom series from the past two weeks. In case you missed any, all the links are below:

We certainly didn’t cover all angles possible under this topic; no classes on Mormonism outside of America, most notably. But I am thrilled with the broad range of perspectives and backgrounds exemplified in the various posts, and the number of questions they raise.

I’m still not covinced that, in most cases, a course devoted to Mormonism is the best option, save in special circumstances. I’m of the mind that Mormonism works best when included amongst a plethora of groups dealing with the same issues. Yet I do believe Mormonism can serve a useful case study for a number of topics, as demonstrated through the various theoretical and real courses listed above.

Any general thoughts on the series? Do you think Mormonism works well in the classroom? What other courses would you have in mind? How would you incorporate Mormonism into broader courses? What books on Mormonism do you think work best in the undergraduate classroom?

Article filed under Miscellaneous


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Jeff T on Mormon Studies in Unexpected: “Great stuff, Christopher!”


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Christopher on Mormon Studies in Unexpected: “Good catch, Janiece. Yes, that seems likely to me.”


JJohnson on Mormon Studies in Unexpected: “Fascinating, Christopher. Surely the Eliza bio and fireside is fictionalizing Newell and Avery's experience with Mormon Enigma. Right?”


Ben S on For Your Consideration: A: “Right on. It speaks to old traditions that equal inclusion strikes people as novel or unbalanced.”


JJohnson on For Your Consideration: A: “"WE REALLY OUGHT TO CLASSIFY THE OLD HISTORY, THE TYPE THAT OVERLOOKS/EXCLUDES WOMEN, AS "MEN'S HISTORY," LEAVING THE TITLE "HISTORY" FOR THE INCLUSIVE KIND." THIS.…”

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