Wilford Woodruff’s Nauvoo Home–A Photograph

By December 31, 2010

Taken summer 2010.

For brief information on the Wilford Woodruff home, see the home’s Mormon Historic Sites Foundation page.

Article filed under Miscellaneous


Comments

  1. No response yet, so here’s a thought. This is a lovely home, even today. So are some of the other homes one can see in Nauvoo. I wonder, though, how many people actually lived in such nice dwellings. From what I’ve read, there was a great deal of poverty in Nauvoo, lots of folks living in shanties and makeshift dwellings. We probably should not think that Pres. Woodruff’s nice house is in any way typical of the Nauvoo period.

    Comment by Ray — January 5, 2011 @ 2:53 pm

  2. Ray, thanks for commenting. I think you’re right that this red brick style with the (not sure what the right architectural terms are) peaked ends has become something of a symbol of Nauvoo and that this obscures some of the realities of life in the city. I will be reviewing Benjamin Pykles Excavating Nauvoo for Mormon Historical Studies, so hopefully I’ll have more to report on this.

    Comment by Jared T — January 6, 2011 @ 12:11 pm


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