Articles by

Emily

Why I Like Mormon History

By February 4, 2010


Sometimes I get bogged down in the details of my job and forget just how much I enjoy what I do. I?ve developed a list to remind myself why I got into this field just in case the tedium of it starts getting to me. Some of these are kind of silly, but others can have a profound impact.

  1. Old stuff. This is probably a prerequisite for anyone getting involved in history.

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Getting Started in Mormon History

By January 28, 2010


My first foray into Mormon history was a complete and abysmal failure. I think I?ve destroyed all evidence of that paper because I would probably be fired for my complete stupidity. The school project was to prepare an annotated bibliography on a topic that could become a senior thesis. It sounded fairly easy and because I liked Mormon history and lived within a stone?s throw of a major Mormon site, I chose a Mormon topic. I was working at the time in interlibrary loan so I assumed that on the odd chance my school didn?t have anything, I could find other schools nearby with good sources. At the end of the project, I was under the impression that no one was doing Mormon history

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Understanding Your Audience

By January 25, 2010


About 6% of all buildings in the United States were constructed before 1920.

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Creating Historic Sites

By January 22, 2010


A colleague of mine is fond of saying that historic markers say more about the people doing the marking than the people or events being marked. That statement holds true for historic sites. The structures and landscapes we choose to preserve, restore, rehabilitate, conserve, and maintain retain stories and significance long past the structures primary period of significance. The Sacred Grove is significant primarily for a single event on an early spring day in 1820 but the way that grove has been used and preserved in the intervening decades reveals information about the Smith family, 19th century farming techniques, and the differing philosophies guiding preservation in the LDS Church, just to name a few.

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Church Historic Sites

By January 14, 2010


Have you ever lingered in the Sacred Grove? Paused to read the inscription on a headstone at the Winter Quarters Cemetery? Wondered aloud how the pioneers fit in those little benches at the Salt Lake Tabernacle? Glanced at the historic marker at Benbow farm? If the answer is yes, you have interacted with a church historic site.

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